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  "Shadow of the Bat -- Part 1"
     The title card opens with the backing repeating motif from the "Batgirl Theme"; I'm not up on my instruments, but I think it's a french horn.  It's a nice hints at things to come and it doesn't just fade out with the title card, it keeps going into the opening of the episode, creating a sense of impending drama.
     The dramatic piece that accompnies Gordon being arrested and hauled off sound akin to the motif from the action music in "Feat of Clay -- Part 2" (that makes at least three episodes that do this).
     This score offers way more than the second one does (even in general interest of the episode), and it continues to offer up more as the show comes back from a break with delicate harp playing up and down with eventually Two-Face's theme lightly, with a tone of uneasiness.
     Soon after Batgirl's theme gets it's first outing, first masking as Batman's theme, but quickly transforms into her theme, then dies off after a bell toll.  A good way to start, but it doesn't end there was very soon after the full-fledge rendition of her heroic theme kicks in.  A rousing piece with string strumming, drum beats like percussion, and trumpet playing the theme.
     Down fro ma fight with Robin at her side, her theme plays warmly with oboe, then light flute, before taking one more stride into the full theme.  the oboe part is quite beautiful and it makes you wish there had been more of that.
     Pizzicato of the vilolin strings takes into the next short, but sweet rendition of her theme a little later.
     A little eight-note decending detective working theme that has appeared in small doses in other episodes gets a couple longer stretches in the episode.  It's not until their appearence now that I note it's previous use, so I realize now more continuity in themes happens than expected.
     The string stumming start again and works it's way into final statement of her theme, leaving us with promises of more for the score and resolution of the second part of the episode, but sadly it fails to deliver on both counts.  Shame really, there was so much potential.

     Orchestration: Lolita Ritmanis




Alfred "... one would think the fall of Rupert Thorne would bring a smile even to your face."
Bruce: "I'd love to know who this mysterious informant is; this is the third gang lord Mason has brought down in as many months."
Alfred: With sarcasm, "Yes, it's quite alarming. If this continues you might even be forced into taking a vacation," walks away.



  "Shadow of the Bat -- Part 2"
          Batgirl's theme returns for the episode, which is a plus, because it's catchy and fits the character.
     There's some jazzy action music during the first encounter with Two-Face's men, that is remeniscent of something Lalo Schifrin might have done back during the day.  Unfortunately this is all the episode offers and her theme does not return, even in the finale.

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  "Blind As A Bat"  
     While you may not notice it at first, during the battle and pursuit with the Penguin, Batman, and the two aircraft, the frantic counterpoint playing underneath the main melody is the Penguyin theme, interspurced with the Batman motif.  It's a clver scoring technique and works well to he images.

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Lackey: "Heh heh, look at 'em -- taking off like scared pigeons! Huh."
Penguin: Poking his lackey with the umbrella point "You find pigeons funny, my friend?"
Lackey: "No boss, not me."



  "The Demon's Quest -- Part 1"  
     McCuistion opens with medium paced string ostinato with dark instrumentation over for the episode where an adversary hinted at the end of the episode "Off Balance" finally makes his showing for a two-parter.

     Music Editor: Thomas Milano
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  "The Demon's Quest -- Part 2"  
     The late Harvey Cohen provides and interesting score, along with a memorable melodic theme during a desert crossing sequence (pictured left) which harkens to such scores as "Lawrence of Arabia".
     Using occasionally Arabian instruments in the score, Cohen even Araba-tizes "Batman's Theme" briefly.

     Music Editor: Thomas Milano
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  "His Silicon Soul"  
     Being that this episode centers around Batmn pretty heavily -- without divulging the plot to those who have not seen it -- Walker's "Batman Theme" is used quite extensively.
     During a scene in Wayne Manor with Alfred, some strong action scoring is used.
     Later in the episode when a recap of what happened is being showed to us, some ominous music is playing under and when the show comes back from commercial, Walker's "Batman Theme" plays as Batman searches, but under it is a repeating decrescendoing note that keeps the tension for what is about to transpire.

     Music Editor: J. J. George
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Batman: "So why don't you finish me off?  Or have you become enough like me to know I won't take a life?"



  "Fire From Olympus"  
     Walker provides one of the best scores of her career, giving Maximillian Zeus -- a man who has lost his mind and thinks he IS Zeus -- a big theme with deep, deep drums constantly pounding like Richard Strauss' "Sunrise", and a strong theme.  For the silly sounding plot, the episode is handled very well and is an enjoyable watch.

     Music Editor: Thomas Milano
     Orchestration: Lolita Ritmanis














  "Read My Lips"  
     Only once in a blue moon does any composer on the series stray from the normal scoring approach ("Almost Got 'Im" being an example), and Walker chooses what I think may well be her only time delving into the world of jazz, and I'm not sure it it's intentional, but the spinning news papers and the accompanying score sounds almost like a homage to the 1966 Batman series when it would do the spinning trick.

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     Orchestration: Lolita Ritmanis











  "The Worry Men"  
     Sadly, I can't say anything nice about this score.  It's the least impressive effort of the run, and offers nothing new or special up, and no themes to speak of.  It just basically tries to support the action on screen, which needed supporting.

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     Orchestration: Lolita Ritmanis












  "Sideshow"  
     No review; the score didin't offer enough to warrent it.

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  "Trial"  
     There is not much score at all in this episode, but there is a quick flourish of the "Joker's Theme", and Cohen also briefly states Walker's "Batman Theme" as he is in peril, being dragged off to be wasted.
     The ending sort of makes up for the unusually quiet episode and provides some nice moments.

     Music Editor: Daryl Kell
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  "A Bullet for Bullock"  
     Another atypical scoring approch for the show, the late Harvey R. Cohen's score won an Emmy.  The episode title card opens with a light jazzy ensamble with a sax, much like a detective film noir, which was bound to happen on the show anyway considering by the look of everything from the cars to the radios, that the series was set about the late 1950's.
     Plucking, cymbal taps, trumpet, some flute, it's all there
     During the last quarter of the episode there is a rousing jazz piece for the fight with a drug boss, and during the beginning on that piece, Bamtn's theme get a jazzy rendition.

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Batman: "A professional hit man would do you here, not on the street."
Bullock: "So what?  A guy who gets whacked by an amateur is just as stiff as a pro job."



  "Avatar"  
     I only have a suite (6:26) to go by that is the title card and what follows it, but it begins big with a clanging bell and what sounds like a french horn playing at high register a grand sounding theme.
     Chimes, an middle eastern sounding wind instrument, strings, drum, and more make it a nice orchestra score.
     A pretty theme is later played on strings while plucking, twin trumpets, flute, and the drum make occasional appearances to give it a steady even tone of full sounding orchestra.

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  "House and Garden"  
     No review.

     Music Editor: Daryl Kell
     Orchestration: Lolita Ritmanis














Batman: "You haven't changed a bit."
Poison Ivy: "Yes I have, I meant it when I said I wanted a family that loves me. I just wanted it on my terms."
Robin: "Lady, you're nuts."
Poison Ivy: "Well, that's your opinion. Probably the last one you'll ever have, too."



  "The Terrible Trio"  
     The two-note "theme" in the titld card is just that: a them for the trio.  Similar in vein to Poison Ivy's theme, the theme is heard again in the episode, and during a scene at a pool, expands into a very nice rendition.
     Like "The Laughing Fish", the episode score aims more for the drama on screen, and thus makes the score stand out more than an average effort.

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     Orchestration: Lolita Ritmanis











  "Harlequinade"  
     Cute moment, while Harley is playing with her doll in her cell, and Walker's theme for her is playing, Harley briefly hums her own theme.
     A little after 8:30 into the episode, a piano player gets a some screen time and I can't help but wonder if that was really the piano player in the episode; mystery to be solved later, I guess.

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     Orchestration: Lolita Ritmanis










Bad guy selling nuclear bomb: After telling what they can do with it, "Now, what am I bid?"
Joker: Walking out of the shadows, "Hooow about nooothiiing; zero, zip, zilch, nadda," throws a metal playing card into the deck at the feet of the auctioneer, "my personal check for bupkis, drawn on the First National Bank of Squidoo!"



  "Time Out of Joint"  
     I was disappointed to not see Rodriguez score the return of the Clock King, but Carl Johnson, who earlier I mentioned -- along with Kline -- did a great job on another episode -- scores this one, alone.  He even uses the Clock King's theme.
     Deep pounding drum, trumpet, strings, and what sound like a type of xylophone all make this one of the best scores of the series, in my view.

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  "Catwalk"  
     The episode opens with the familiar Catwoman theme, and in the following recaps of the events that led her to where her character is now, various renditions of her theme and dramatic scoring compliment the images.
     Out of all the character themes her in the series, Catwoman theme is the second -- next to Batman's -- to get the most variation and interesting orchestration.  Picking ip again in the episode where Selina is considering theiving again, a playful motif from her theme plays as she talks to her cat.  It soon trasitions into action in the coming scenes.










Veronica: "Since you're so devoted to wild life, Selina, I can't wait to hear what you think of the museum's new Conservation Hall. I had it built in honor of my grand father, Stanton Vreeland. He was the first to realize the important of preserving rare animals."
Selina: "Not surprising, considering how many of them he oliterated."
Veronica: "Excuse me?"
Selina: "Stanton Vreeland was a playboy sportsman who'd blow away anything that wondered into his gun sight. He had to preserve animals or he'd have nothing left to shoot."
Veronica: Pissed, "Is that right?"
Selina: "Uh huh. In fact, many of these creatures are gone thanks to trigger-happy jerks like old grandpa."
Bruce: "Selina..."
Selina: "But, Bruce -- Mrs. Vreeland asked me what I thought."



  "Bane"  
     Ritmanis provides a score that suits the episode and gives it the needed amount of action and dramatic hits that kept it from losing steam.

     Music Editor: Daryl Kell
     Orchestration: Lolita Ritmanis














Batman: "He trashed my car, Alfred.  Between a couple of guys, that's real personal."



  "Baby Doll"  
     No review.

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  "The Lion and the Unicorn"  
     Langsbard's only solo episode.  He does an interesting job and doesn't stick to the style of scoring fans associate with the series.
     We learn more about Alfred's past, and get butt kicked in the London.  England.
     The music reaches dramatic proportions as Trafalgar Square in London is almost blown to bits and one of the most pulse racing Batman moments.

     Music Editor: Daryl Kell
     Orchestration:











Dick: "Must be pretty important; Alfred wouldn't leave a dirty dish unwashed if England was sinking into the sea."



  "Showdown"  
     Here is the title card.
     How could any Batman episode that turns into a secret past in the old west not be interesting?  Come on.
     The episode does feature a little (unfortunately not more) western sounding score, it mostly fits into the standard scoring mode.  It's pretty good scoring.
     The character it centers around gets his own theme which is used right off the bat when he makes his first appearance; you'd almost expect the theme to come out of a slightly modern western film.
     During a ending fight on the "sky monster", some action plays and culminates shortly before it ends in a strong theme that sound like the theme described earlier.
     Though no wording or action is implied, the character I am talking about, Jonah Hex, seems to be the Batman of the day, which is hinted at in the score in a scene where Jonah is lurking around and the four-note Batman motif plays one time.

     Music Editor: Daryl Kell
     Orchestration:



Duvall: "You're either a liar or a fool."
Jonah Hex: "I've been known to be foolish, but ain't nobody calls me a liar and goes to bed happy."



  "Riddler's Reform"  
     The Riddler returns, and so does McCuistion; the score is typical.

     Music Editor: Daryl Kell
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Riddler: "... we're going to make a killing."
Robin: "That's what I'm afraid of."



  "Second Chance"  
     Hayen's last effort for the series where Two-Face gets a chance to have another go at life.
     There is some fun action scoring and melancholy music for the despair of Two-Face.
     Also, this is another episode where Robin and Batman sort of butt heads, letting you know it's almost inevitable Robin would one day depart and become Nightwing.
     I do not recall hearing Two-Face's theme, but during a short scene where Batman is investigating the Penguin in prison, the Penguin's theme is used, and an interesting violin interpretation while he makes his pet birds dance, is used.
     This is a gripping orchestra moment, when combined with the imagery, as Two-Face takes his decision making with the coin, way too far and it almost kills him.

     Music Editor: Daryl Kell
     Orchestration:





Harvey/Two-Face: Before going under the knife for reconstructive surgery, "Bruce Wayne picked up the tab for this?"
Doctor: "Yes."
Harvey/Two-Face: "Good old Bruce -- he's never given up on me; always been my best friend.  I remember when we used to close the town at the Half Moon Club ... most fun we ever had," dozes off from anesthetic, eyes closing, "heard they were tearing the old place down.  I guess nothing good lasts forever."



  "Harley's Holiday"  
     The title card of the episode opens with a theme that had earlier been introduced in "Harlequinade" -- "Harley's Theme"
     Of interesting note is a action motif used while Robin is fighting that later appeared in a "Superman: The Animated Series" episode.

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     Orchestration: Lolita Ritmanis












Harley: In handcuffs at Arkham Asylum, "There's one thing I gotta know: why did you stay with me all day?  Risking your butt for someone who's never given you anything but trouble?"
Batman: "I know what it's like trying to rebuild a life," pulls out the dress Harley had earlier tried to buy, "I had a bad day too ... once."
Harley: "Nice guys like you shouldn't have bad days."



  "Lock-Up"  
     Karter, along with Langsbard's first effort, score this episode.
     I couldn't help but think the character Lyle Bolton is modeled after a certain ... savage radio host...

     Music Editor: Daryl Kell
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Robin: "Another fine villain made possible by a grant from the Wayne foundation."
Pissed look from Batman.



  "Make 'em Laugh"  
     Listen to the title card HERE.  As you can hear, it's a little off kilter, but so is the rest of the score.
     The score doesn't stand out or try to do anything grand (though it has a nice ending), but it's different enough an interesting in little parts to make for a listen on it's own.  Basically, it's what "The Worry Men" could have been, had it tried to be exotic and try things, like it did in it's title card, but never moved beyond.

     Music Editor: Daryl Kell
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  "Deep Freeze"  
     Mr. Freeze never gets a break, and this sad episode, with sad ending, is scored by Walker alone.

     Music Editor: Daryl Kell
     Orchestration: Lolita Ritmanis












Grant Walker: On a huge television set in Oceana, after robots capture Batman and Robin, "Every time I open a park I get gate crashers."
Batman: "I've seen your insane vision of the future, Walker."
Grant Walker: "My world will have no crime, violence, or pain."
Robin: "You can add free will to that list, too!"
Grant Walker: "A small price to pay for order."
Batman: "Your order, for your select few!"
Grant Walker: "Excuse me," in a smug tone and look, "but I fail to see the point in that."



  "Batgirl Returns"  
     The late Harvey Cohen does a good job, even using Walker's "Batgirl Theme" that originally appeared in the two-parter, "Shadow Of A Bat" (part two, I believe).

     Music Editor: Daryl Kell
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Catwoman: To Batgirl as she shows off her steel claws, "Bats are just mice with wings, little girl..."